The record of amusing things for his lordship Sir Chaws, Duke of Kowanga , Archbishop of the World for the Orthodox Church of Awesome-ism, and acquirer of phony baloney titles.

 

Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (via historical-nonfiction)

hamlott:

Finally upload these guys, huzzah! A little shout out to those folks who like gents in historical clothing as much as I do. Took advantage of the Doctor’s timey wimey time travels and placed him in different eras (mainly to see if i can pull it off. I think I did, did I?)

Anyway, here’s 9,10,11, and 12 in the clothing of Philip II of Spain (1598-1621), Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor (1792-1806), Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Prince Consort (tenure 1840-1861), and Nicholas II of Russia (1894-1917) respectively. This is done purely to see if I can do it and for a bit of fun and in no way is meant to compare the characters to historical figures.

So yeah. If anyone’s interested in purchasing prints of these guys, leave me a message. Sadly, I will only be able to entertain those who are in the Philippines but I’ll keep you guys posted when I get around to making a Society6 account. Cheers for now!

thecivilwarparlor:

The South Has Risen Again… in Brazil — Meet the “Confederados”

No one has determined how many Americans immigrated to Brazil in the years following the end of the American Civil War. As noted in unpublished research, Betty Antunes de Oliveira found in port records of Rio de Janeiro that some 20,000 Americans entered Brazil from 1865 to 1885. Other researchers have estimated the number at 10,000. An unknown number returned to the United States when conditions in the southern US improved. Most immigrants adopted Brazilian citizenship

In the east of Brazil, two hours away from Sao Paulo, there’s a small community that has a direct blood link with people from the southern United States. They call themselves “Confederados”. Families with last names like Thomas, Strong or Williamson are living proof of the American emigration from Brazil that started after the Civil War. They left the devastation in the southern states to start over in Brazil, which was still a slaveholder nation. The Americans brought with them their expertise in farming, especially cotton, and helped start an agricultural revolution in Brazil. The descendants of these first immigrants are very proud of their roots and while they display the confederate flag proudly, they insist they are not racist and they denounce slavery.

The descendants foster a connection with their history through the Associação Descendência Americana (American Descendants Association), a descendant organization dedicated to preserving their unique mixed culture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederados

The lost colony of the Confederacy By Eugene C. Harter

mauve-alert:

I feel like I’m at a point in my life where I know I need to advance the main quest, but instead I faff about doing side quests because the main quest is intimidating and I don’t feel like I’ve leveled up enough to be able to handle it.

ryanestradadotcom:

Learn To Read Russian in 15 Minutes! I did this one with my fabulous guest writer Peter Starr Northrop, aka bilgeathresh! If you want me to make these dang comics more often, visit my Patreon!